Safety Training Voice Overs

Safety Training Voice Overs | Voice Talent Service | ProVoice USA Blog

The internet has made safety training much more efficient over the last 10 years. What would have cost an employer hundreds to thousands of dollars to rent out a conference room, send employees out to a training session and all that is included in that, can now be done online with E-Learning online videos and safety training modules done from the comfort and convenience of the office or home. Safety training is critical to a company’s compliance and to reduce the liability of an incident.

OSHA, LockOut/TagOut, all the lingo that is involved in a safety training presentation, we at ProVoiceUSA has said it all before, and is continually trusted year after year, module after module by some of the biggest corporations in America. Some of our long running safety training voice over projects are for companies like Chevron Southern California, Shell Oil Puget Sound, and many many more.

When you need your project done quickly, accurately and with top quality audio gear from a seasoned professional, you can trust ProVoiceUSA for your safety training video voice overs. We have over 20 years in the industry and are here 52 weeks a year, 5 days a week. We can typically turn around about 10 minutes of finished voice per day and more can be arranged if bigger projects are needed to be completed in a pinch.

Please contact us online or call us at 1-877-865-3459 for all your e-learning/safety module voice over needs.

 

The Fall of the Voice Over Industry

The Fall of the Voice Over Industry | ProVoice USA Blog

10-15 years ago, you had a chance to get into the voice over industry to become a voice talent. It’s what I wanted to do and was able to pursue it. I had a full-time TV production job making commercials (writing, shooting, editing, voicing, etc). Actually won 2 Telly Awards for my commercials. My heart was in audio and voice over. So, I started the website GoodCheapVoiceOver.com, advertised on Google with low rates, and turned out a good product after my day job hours. Within a year I was able to make the jump to do this full-time.

I was criticized heavily for my rate structure for doing voice-overs. NASTY emails from the ‘good ol boys’ voice talent group. You know, the people who say ‘I won’t power up the mic for less than $500’. But I was on a mission to make it work. I worked hard, worked long hours, but guess what, I had the workload to make it work. And I was blown away at how I could be making a good living doing what I loved.

I cruised for about 10 years, then sites like Fiverr came along. At first, it was a gag type site. ‘Get a dancing Santa-gram for $5’. So, there was a hand-full of voice talent that had nothing to lose (and sucked) and they thought they could make some money. They probably did $5 at a time. Over the last few years, Fiverr has grown, and more and more voice talent have hopped on board, and some decent ones, pushing down all the lame Fiverr starter voice over talent out of existence. Nowadays, if you are trying to start a career in voice-over work, good luck trying to get any traction, thanks to the 500+ voice talent on Fiverr that are working for peanuts as they have grown to be a huge confusing ‘mark up scheme’ type company.

If you think you are getting a good deal with them, just wait till all the markups are factored in. It’s actually cheaper to get voice over with ProVoiceUSA. All our basic services (that they mark-up) such as editing/formatting/de-breathing/etc are included. What would cost you $85 with them is $30 with us. Unfortunately, some people think that they are the best deal, so they have a decent gullible client base.

It sucks to say, but it’s pretty true… if you are just starting out in the voice over business, it’s going to be a reallllly hard (if not impossible) journey. I am glad I was able to get in when I did, hit it as hard as I did, and made the money that I did. I wouldn’t have done anything differently. I have been able to build up a strong client base that is able to carry us through the slow down. The last few years and the years coming up have been/definitely is the fall of the voice over industry.

I bought a Neumann TLM103 for the 4th time for voice talent applications

For voice overs, the TLM 103 is a ‘Really Good Mic’.    Nothing spectacular, but a very good mix of frequency response and saturation to give the voice over a nice neutral sound.    I sold my TLM before I got the Apollo.  Once I got the Apollo, I wanted to hear how a TLM 103 would sound for voice overs using the different preamps.   Found a never used, 6 month old TLM 103 on Craigslist near here listed for $600.   I think the guy thought he was going to be a music producer at one time, but now he needed to pay his mortgage.   I pull up and he brings out a pile of stuff, TLM 103 on a small stand, wires, boxes, etc.  Hands it all to me and says ‘here’   Sweet.  He took $550.  I took the extra Mogami cables and left him the crappy little stand.   He was happy and I was blown away by the deal.    I have to admit, the TLM is nothing great, but through the Apollo, it does sound a bit more pro than the modified MXL v67 I had been using and has some more saturation than the Mojave 201 I use on occasion.    If you have the cash, a TLM 103 will never let you down for voice overs.  Just be sure to pair it with a preamp that adds some saturation to the sound in order to tame the sometimes referred-to ‘harshness’.   I don’t think the mic introduces anything obnoxious, but if you are using a cheap preamp, it won’t flatter the TLM at all.   Good combo is the Daking mic Pre One or the apollo using a Neve or Manley preamp and the LA2a compressor to soften it all up.  For your voice over needs, visit us at here

 

The Apollo Twin

Honestly, I didn’t really expect or need the Apollo Twin to work well for voiceover work. I have invested thousands of dollars on a rack of gear I have fine-tuned over the years for my preferred voiceover style. I didn’t want to think that anyone could just get a UA Apollo Twin and have great production value straight out of a box. I was looking for an upgrade over a basic interface for travel voice over recording (I had been using Shure X2U interface, which was great), but I wasn’t sure if a UA Apollo twin USB would work with my laptop and/or Cool Edit Pro. (Which I still religiously use, even after trying Audition CS6 and even ProTools. I still prefer the speed of Cool Edit. GET OFF MY LAWN!)

I quickly found that my laptop DID have USB 3, but the processor wasn’t listed on the approved processors. I was able to find a Twin USB on Craigslist for $500, so what the hell. All I can say is… DAMN! I’ve had the Apollo Twin for 2 months and have used it to do 95% of my voice talent work. On top of that, I have purchased approximately $1300 worth of plugins and have been so happy with it. So happy in fact, I purchased a 2nd one along with a 2nd laptop. I am amazed at its sound quality and versatility. (You save settings for any amount of sessions you want.  Fantastic!) I am even selling off some of my rack gear, rendered unnecessary by this addition to my voiceover toolbox.

As much as it hurts my pride, I must admit that Apollo from UA is fantastic!!

Update (Feb 9, 2018):

I still love this thing and I use it for almost everything. Previously, I had been using my main rack of gear for things that needed a certain compressor sound, but I found a way to insert that into the Apollo.  The only time I don’t use the Apollo is when I need to record someone else’s voice and I want to monitor it from outside of the audio booth (like kids, or even Olympic Athlete Brenda Martinez who was here last week to record for New Balance). Besides that, the Apollo has completely won me over.

They now offer a version of the Apollo, the Thunderbolt, that runs off the bus power from a computer, not needing an external power supply. None of my laptops have that option, so I will continue using the USB3 version for the next few years.

If you’re looking for great plugins, I suggest the Neve 1073. It adds some great heft to your audio. The “stock” preamp that came with the Apollo is great, adding more mid-forward without any character. A MUST-HAVE for anyone doing commercial work would be the Valley People Dynamite noise gate. Set it right for an incredibly smooth sound. I recently purchased the Oxide Tape and Distressor plugins. I use the latter for almost everything and the Oxide for added air and saturation

I guess you could say the Apollo is my new audio love affair. I’ve even sold off 5 more pieces of my “pro” travel rig including my Symetrix, a couple Aphex comps, and my roadrunner case.

Voice over audio interfaces, when to spend a little $$

I am always on the quest to find the next great piece of voice over audio gear.   Not that I need it, just never know what I’m missing.    A couple of days ago I did a ‘why the hell not’ purchase of a new USB audio interface after hearing a fellow VO friend mention it was a good unit.   I was using a Focusrite FORTE for voice over recording (keep in mind, only using it to convert the analog output from my audio gear to digital, wasn’t using the preamps in the unit) and I liked it.   But had heard some good things about the Audient ID14 usb interface.     Got a good deal on a ‘as new’ one ($200) vs the retail price of $299, figuring I wouldn’t loose much if any if I didn’t like it and needed to resell.    In the past I had used an RME Babyface for voice over recording, but actually found it too clean and sterile.  I know, you don’t expect a USB interface to introduce character to a voice file, but the converters can add some flavor.    Anyway, got the Audient hooked up and dialed in and love it.   It’s kind of a mix between the Forte and the Babyface in terms of some character but also very clean.    I hear good things about the preamps in the Audient interfaces, but since I don’t plan on using the phantom power/preamps, I can only attest to the sound of the converters….love it.       My ‘studio B’ setup (that I do auditions on a dozen or so times a day) uses the Scarlett 2i2 For converting and it’s a good box.    You can get those for like $100 street price.         So Audient ID14 interface,  $225 or so street price, AWESOME interface.   Not too complicated, seems solid, hope to last for many years.     Focusrite Forte, about same street price.  VERY good interface.   The drivers and digital control system can be a bit sketchy, it treated me right, but for some reason I was expecting it to start smoking at anytime.   Focusrite Scarlett 2i2, good box, many MANY voice talent use this and have great results.   I read some voice talent saying they fail after a while, so we’ll see what happens.    A GREAT portable usb converter/preamp is a Shure X2U.  This is what I use on the road and it’s a great tiny ‘in line’ interface.    REALLY a smart purchase.  I did work on the road with it this summer with my Sennheiser MKH416 and nobody noticed I wasn’t in my $8000 studio.  Here our work here and ask for a custom demo!

Why the voice over microphone you choose is so important

I’ve been doing voice overs for the last 15 years full time.   The one thing that amazes me still after all this time is how much a microphone can contribute to the feel of a voice over read.    It’s subtle, but the different sound characteristics of a microphone can change the feel of a read a LOT.     I have gathered up a selection of microphones that work with my particular voice talent style that covers most of the bases.   Things like transformers/frequency response/etc all determine how things will sound once your yap hole hits the microphone diaphragm.    There really is no ‘one perfect’ voice over microphone for all talent and all applications.  But there are some ‘fail-safe’ microphones that won’t be ‘wrong’ either.    If you want a very clean and neutral microphone that is nothing special, but will be ‘okay’ on all voice over applications would be the Neumann TLM 103.   If you don’t have that kind of money sitting around ($700 or so used), you can always go with the CAD E100S ($250 or so used) or a MXL V67G ($70 used).   All sound similar.    I sold my TLM 103 once I heard the CAD E100s.  Same sound, but for much less cost.   I didn’t use the TLM 103 that much, but wanted ‘that sound’ incase I needed it.     The MXL has similar frequency response and saturation, a great mic for the TLM 103 sound without the cost.     I’ve guided a couple voice talent to the MXL and they’ve been happy with it.      Another popular voice over microphone is the Sennheiser MKH 416 shotgun mic.    It’s the ‘lazy mans’ voice over microphone.   Pretty good to use if your recording booth isn’t very good and you don’t like to do any EQ work.    I have one that I mostly use for travel and also auditions that I record in my main open area (not my booth).   Voice talent also like the MKH 416 due to the frequency push in the upper mids that make it push through the mix….it’s okay that way but can get annoying/shrill pretty quick.   Do NO use it for long form narrations..also has a tendency to respond better to male vs female voices.     The Neumann U87 mic is kind of the ‘holy grail’ for voice overs.   However, this seems to be one of the most ‘picky’ in terms of the voice style that it makes sound good vs absolutely awful.     It’s enhances voices that have a naturally lower register.  Anyone who has a neutral voice or higher pitch will sound awful on this mic…’like ass’ due to the mid low frequency hype.   I have had talent get all excited about getting a U87, then use it for one or two session and then shelve it because they sounded awful.  Most of them had a mid range to higher pitch voice (females).     One of my favorite microphones is the Blue Baby Bottle mic ($250 used).    It can be temperamental if EQ is not set right, but it’s fairly smooth, doesn’t hype frequencies that interfere with voice overs (such as REALLY low frequencies that turn the reads into mud), has a natural push in the upper mid frequencies, but still maintains pretty smooth voice sound.    I use that most of the time for long form or commercial work.      Then a very HI-FI voice over microhophone, with a very full frequency response is the Mojave Audio 201Fet mic.    EXTREMELY clean/clear.   Not much saturation sound at all, very easy to EQ to get the rumbling low end and clean high end.    That’s the mic I use when I know I am going to process my voice over a lot with compression in post.       So these are the microphones I like most for my voice over style and what I need to do day in and day out.